Still More Evidence Warming to Bring Stronger Hurricances

from Wildlife Promise

It seems like every day, we learn more evidence of the climate crisis and its impact on people. Today’s proof — a new report from a special World Meteorological Organization panel of 10 experts in both hurricanes & climate change:

The study offers projections for tropical cyclones worldwide by the end of this century, and some experts said the bad news outweighs the good. Overall strength of storms as measured in wind speed would rise by 2 to 11 percent, but there would be between 6 and 34 percent fewer storms in number. Essentially, there would be fewer weak and moderate storms and more of the big damaging ones, which also are projected to be stronger due to warming.

An 11 percent increase in wind speed translates to roughly a 60 percent increase in damage, said study co-author Kerry Emanuel, a professor of meteorology at MIT.

The storms also would carry more rain, another indicator of damage, said lead author Tom Knutson, a research meteorologist at NOAA.

The study reiterates much of what National Wildlife Federation climate scientist Dr. Amanda Staudt in her report on global warming & stronger storms:


To learn more about the economic costs of inaction on climate pollution, including the impact of stronger storms, check out this NRDC report.