Magazine Readers Report Hummingbird Sightings

from Wildlife Promise

Ruby-throated hummingbird

Ruby-throated hummingbird

After Pat Neuhaus read in the December/January issue of National Wildlife that out-of-range-and-season sightings of hummingbirds are becoming increasingly common, he put out his sugar-water feeders. The next day, a hummingbird arrived in his South Carolina yard.

“I hope to go by his house this weekend to try to band this hummer,” says Doreen Cubie, a licensed bander and author of the feature that inspired Neuhaus to take action. Bob Sargent of the Hummer/Bird Study Group put the two in touch after the homeowner reported his sighting. Both Cubie and Sargent are part of a coalition studying the apparent shifts in the cold-weather ranges of several hummingbird species.

“Bob Sargent emailed me to say he has received nearly 700 replies so far from people who read the hummingbird article and have hummingbirds in their yards now,” reports Cubie. “Pretty amazing, really. Because of these contacts from National Wildlife readers, wintering hummingbirds have been banded in Pennsylvania, Michigan and in several places in the Southeast.”

Report winter hummingbirds: If you have a sugar-water feeder out and spot a hummingbird, the Hummer/Bird Study Group would like hear from you. Contact the group at rubythroat@aol.com.

Find out more: Read “The Hummingbirds of Winter” by Doreen Cubie, then check out her tips for attracting these avian pollinators to your garden.