House Casts a Climate Vote and Wildlife Takes a Hit

from Wildlife Promise

An egret in flight over the Bombay Hooke National Wildlife Refuge. Photo donated by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Kim Taylor.

An egret in flight over the Bombay Hooke National Wildlife Refuge. Photo donated by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Kim Taylor.

Today the U.S. House of Representatives voted to undermine common-sense protections for America’s wildlife and public health. 223 members cast their vote supporting a bill dubbed the Polluter Protection Act, which would directly undermine the Environmental Protection Agency’s ability to reduce carbon pollution from power plants, our nation’s largest unregulated source of climate-disrupting pollution.

While the bill passed, there were 183 members who cast a “NO” vote and, in doing so, stood up for wildlife, public health and safety, and clean air for all Americans. See how your member of Congress voted, and please make sure you call or email to express your thanks.

We particularly want to give a nod of appreciation (and you can too) to the three Republicans who broke with their party and opposed this attack on common sense actions to better protect the environment and ensure the safety of our nation’s coasts: Representatives Frank LoBiondo of  New Jersey, Chris Gibson of New York and Jamie Herrera Beutler of Washington. Their vote sent a clear message that the business of protecting communities and natural resources from runaway climate change is not a partisan issue, but a morally responsible one that every lawmaker should get behind.

The science is clear – if we want to avoid the most devastating impacts of climate change, we must dramatically reduce our carbon pollution and swiftly transition to cleaner sources of energy. Today’s vote is not part of this progress path—it’s a dangerous detour that we can’t afford to take.

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