Simon Hall

Simon Hall is a member of NWF’s International Wildlife Conservation team, and manages the Tropical Forest and Agriculture Project. He works to reduce deforestation associated with the production of key agricultural commodities (beef, leather, soy and palm oil) in South America. Simon earned a M.S. in Natural Resources from North Carolina State University as well as a B.A. in Economics and a B.A. in Environmental Studies from Salisbury University.

How Engaged Consumers Can Help Protect Wildlife In the Amazon

There’s a reason the purple martin (Progne subis) is known as America’s backyard bird. While summering in the U.S., purple martins nest almost exclusively near towns and cities, often in man-made birdhouses. …

Burgers and Wildlife: Let’s Hear From You

Migratory birds like the purple martin, one of America’s most loved songbirds, rely on tropical forests in the Amazon for wintering habitat. Unfortunately, millions of acres of the Brazilian Amazon …

Monumental Win: Amazon Soy Moratorium Renewed Indefinitely

This agreement is a monumental win for wildlife, people, and our climate. The Amazon is home to an incredible array of wildlife, including iconic species such as macaws, jaguars, and …

How the Brazilian Beef Industry is Helping Protect Wildlife Habitat in the Amazon

The National Wildlife Federation (NWF) and the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-M) recently announced the beta launch of a new website and the publication of a new study, highlighting the effectiveness of …

Forest 500: Powerbrokers With The Greatest Potential To Reduce Deforestation

Global Canopy Programme (GCP), with support from NWF, recently released the Forest 500, a ranking of the 500 most powerful organizations and people with the greatest potential to reduce deforestation.  …

New study, co-authored by NWF, shows Amazon Soy Moratorium saves more rainforest

  A new study, titled Brazil’s Soy Moratorium, published in the journal Science shows that the Soy Moratorium has dramatically reduced the amount of deforestation linked to soy production in the …

Working to Protect Wildlife at the International Climate Change Conference – Part 2

Click here to read the previous Wildlife Promise blog (by David Burns) about NWF’s work at the International Climate Change Conference.                 What …

The Amazon Soy Moratorium is safe!

  Despite repeated attacks, the Soy Moratorium in the Brazilian Amazon is safe—at least for a while. This is a huge win, not only for tropical forest conservation, but also for …

The Amazon Soy Moratorium is under threat!

  For nearly 8 years, the Soy Moratorium in the Brazilian Amazon has stood as a shining example of how  the agriculture industry can voluntarily protect forests in the tropics. …

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