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Poplar trees in Oregon. © Charles Knowles/Flickr

Doubling Down on Sustainability – GreenWood’s Oregon Poplar Farm

3/28/2014 // By Ethan Spaner

In early February, Oregon’s GreenWood Tree Farm Fund doubled down on sustainability. Already certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) for its forest management, roundwood logs and wood chips, GreenWood earned certification by the Roundtable on Sustainable Biomaterials (RSB), covering […] Read more >

Field buffer of perennial grasses and forbs in MN. Courtesy of NRCS.

Guidelines to Produce Energy Grasses in Wildlife-Friendly Ways

1/16/2014 // By Ben Larson

One of the great things about my job is being able to learn more about wildlife from experts at NWF, in other organizations, and with consultants working on projects for us. One such project has been especially near and dear […] Read more >

US Fish and Wildlife Service - Northeast Region/Flickr

Weekly News Roundup- December 6, 2013

12/6/2013 // By Anne Goddard

What’s happening at National Wildlife Federation this week? Feeling the Heat.  New NWF photos show the effects of climate change on polar bears. Bioenergy Debacle. Read more about bioenergy development in the Southeast. Sparse Shrimping. Maine shrimp collapse linked to […] Read more >

A brown-headed nuthatch, one of the studies indicator species. Photo by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Virginia Senechal.

Bioenergy and Biodiversity in the Southeast: Like Speeding in a Crowded Neighborhood?

12/5/2013 // By Ben Larson

The street to my house goes through a school zone and our neighborhood is full of kids. I have a school-aged daughter myself. I pride myself on being a safe driver. I try to look carefully and slow down. Of course […] Read more >

Photo courtesy USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Thinking of the Future at America’s Grasslands Conference

8/12/2013 // By Ben Larson

Like a herd of cattle heading to a stock tank, leaders in grassland conservation from all over the country are convening today in Manhattan, KS for two days of reflecting and sharing on how America’s remaining grasslands can be conserved […] Read more >

“An Environmental Disaster of Unimaginable Proportions”

10/4/2012 // By Aviva Glaser

One hundred and twenty billion dollars. That’s how much invasive species cost the United States every year. Most people don’t realize this, but some of our country’s most harmful and costly invasive plants, such as kudzu and purple loosestrife, were actually […] Read more >

credit: South Florida Water Management District

Revisiting the Ten Plagues: 10 Invasive Species That Plague America Today

4/10/2012 // By Amanda Stone

One of the most memorable parts of the Passover Seder is the recounting of the ten plagues that befell Egypt. When I was little we sang silly songs about the frogs, the pests and vermin that overtook the countryside and […] Read more >

USDA: Adult Kudzu Stink Bug, Photo by Joe Eger.

When Good Intentions Grow Bad: Bugs, Vines and Invasions

4/9/2012 // By Mekell Mikell

Kudzu, once hailed as a “miracle vine,” is now a thorn in the side of folks throughout the Southeast. Once used by American farmers as a means to stop soil erosion, this pesky invasive species spread far beyond its intended boundaries. […] Read more >

Weekly News Roundup – April 6, 2012

4/6/2012 // By Aislinn Maestas

Want to know what National Wildlife Federation was up to this week? Here is a recap of the week’s NWF news: Growing Risk for Taxpayers and Wildlife April 4 – Good biofuel crops can make great invasive species. That’s one […] Read more >