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The National Climate Assessment shows that wildlife and communities are already feeling the impacts of climate with rising seas, ocean acidification, heavier precipitation, changes in growing seasons, decreased cold and snow pack, increased incidence of pests, devastating wildfires and droughts, and other significant impacts.  Photo by Mary Harvey

Why Wildlife is Cheering for the Clean Power Plan

8/3/2015 // By Jim Murphy

President Obama has taken a historic and ambitious step in the fight against carbon pollution that threatens wildlife. With the announcement of the finalized Clean Power Plan, the President has enacted the first ever rules designed to reduce harmful greenhouse …

Moose depend on clean water in rivers, streams and ponds, where they feed on aquatic plants.
Photo by Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Leah Serna.

5 Reasons Why Oil and Water Don’t Mix for Wildlife

7/1/2015 // By Jim Murphy

We all know that oil and water don’t mix. But the stakes are especially high for wildlife when oil spills into the lakes, streams and rivers where wildlife live. If industry has its way, more tar sands oil – a …

Transporting tar sands through Vermont would directly threaten the moose, fish and birds that rely on clean water to survive. Photo donated by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Marin Packer.

Scientists’ Report: Clean Power Plan Can Spur Wildlife-Friendly Renewable Energy

10/14/2014 // By Jim Murphy

An important new study put forth by the Union of Concerned Scientists further confirms that the U.S. can do even more to speed the transition to clean energy and reduce climate disrupting carbon pollution than the Environmental Protection Agency assumed …

NWF marching for wildlife #actonclimate

Heading to the People’s Climate March for Wildlife!

9/9/2014 // By Samantha Lockhart

On September 21st, I will be marching with climate activists from across the country in New York City to deliver a clear message: it is time to get serious about climate change. The event is called the People’s Climate March …

Transporting tar sands through Vermont would directly threaten the moose, fish and birds that rely on clean water to survive. Photo donated by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Marin Packer.

Climate Change Really Bugs Wildlife  

8/19/2014 // By Mollie Simon

Who doesn’t love spotting a moose in the wild? Or the satisfaction of a successful garden harvest? Or catching a fish on a beautiful summer’s day? These outdoor experiences are fundamentally important in our lives but are being threatened by …

A moose passes through Pierce Pond in Maine. South Portland's City Council this week showed that local communities can band together in powerful ways to stand up for themselves and their wildlife. Photo credit: Flickr user Michael Lepore.

Tar Sands Vote in Maine Shows Communities Can Stand Up For Wildlife and Win Big

7/22/2014 // By Annie Mackin

The people of South Portland, Maine, made historic news last night. Based on overwhelming vocal public concern about the dangers of toxic tar sands to wildlife and the community, the City Council passed an ordinance that prevents the Portland Pipe …

Tar sands transport threatens common loons here in New England, and tar sands extraction is decimating their nesting habitat in Alberta, Canada. Photo credit: Flickr user Ian Matchett.

Meeting of Governors and Premiers a Big Opportunity for Northeast Wildlife

7/15/2014 // By Annie Mackin

This week, the governors of New England states are meeting with leaders of Canada’s Eastern provinces in the mountains of New Hampshire, at the annual New England Governors and Eastern Premiers Conference. As they make plans and consider policies for …

Not only would Vermont moose be threatened by a tar sands spill here, but they also face challenges due to climate change that will be exacerbated by runaway tar sands expansion. Credit: David Govatski USFWS

Vermont Leads New England on Path to Cleaner Fuel Mix

6/20/2014 // By Annie Mackin

As more Vermonters learn about the threat of climate disrupting tar sands—one of the planet’s dirtiest and most carbon polluting fuels—being transported through the Northeast Kingdom via an aging oil pipeline, it’s increasingly clear that they want nothing to do …

Ttrout are the indicator species of cold water stream health, and are expected to lose much of their habitat due to climate change. Photo by Fish Eye Guy (fisheyeguyphotograpy.com)

Senate Explores Climate Impacts to Sportsmen and Wildlife

6/3/2014 // By Mollie Simon

We already know that global warming is negatively impacting coastal fishing industries, big game species, and outdoor recreation. Every day, sportsmen and outdoor enthusiasts across the country are coping with the effects of climate change. Today, the Senate Committee on …

Chris Crosby plays a trout caught on Colorado's South Platte river May 20. Photo by Russell Bassett

Hunters and Anglers Can’t Afford to Double Down on Denial

6/2/2014 // By Russell Bassett

Hunters and anglers have been on the front lines of several major environmental policy battles over the years, including playing a major role in passing the Clean Air and Clean Water acts, eliminating acid rain, and establishing more public lands …

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