northern-rockies-and-pacific-regional-center Subscribe to Feed

Tribal Member

Honoring the River

4/25/2013 // By Tony Turrini

Everyone knows that mining can be a dirty business, but it turns out that mines are particularly bad news for tribal communities. For more than a century, American Indians and Alaska Natives have suffered the impacts of mining while enjoying …

The Tongue River Railroad’s Failed Public Process

4/22/2013 // By Alexis Bonogofsky

* To my readers. Don’t worry about the pessimistic nature of this post. We will still beat the Tongue River Railroad and the Otter Creek coal mine, with or without a fair public process.  Last week, during a three-day meeting …

Hawaiian monk seal in its native habitat. Vanderlip.

Conservation Council for Hawai‘i Named NWF Affiliate of the Year

4/19/2013 // By Les Welsh

At its annual meeting in March, National Wildlife Federation honored Conservation Council for Hawai‘i (CCH) as its Affiliate of the Year. At the forefront of major campaigns to help recover imperiled Hawaiian plants and animals on the brink of extinction …

Kaden Walksnice getting signatures on the Save Otter Creek sign

Why the Otter Creek Coal Mine Will Never be Built

4/10/2013 // By Guest Author

Guest post by Vanessa Braided Hair. Yesterday, a news station in Billings, Montana ran an interview with Arch Coal representative Mike Rowlands in which he stated that the Otter Creek coal mine, proposed for southeastern Montana, will be in operation by …

Since 1900, Puget Sound Chinook salmon populations have declined 93% and nine runs of Chinook have gone extinct. Orca whales, which eat primarily salmon, have declined by half. Source: Minette Layne/WikiMedia Commons

Is Building in Floodplains a Good Idea?

3/28/2013 // By Dan Siemann

“Where will we put the next million people moving to Puget Sound?” I was asked this question recently by a business lobbyist concerned that new floodplain protection requirements would make building in flood-prone areas more difficult. His question was driven …

Northwest Governors Call on White House to Get Tough on Coal Exports

3/26/2013 // By Guest Author

Guest blog post by Michael O’Leary. More coal burning means more mercury pollution, more acidification, more climate change, and more habitat loss. With plummeting domestic coal consumption leaving coal companies desperate to find new pathways to new markets, the last …

Since 1900, Puget Sound Chinook salmon populations have declined 93% and nine runs of Chinook have gone extinct. Orca whales, which eat primarily salmon, have declined by half. Source: Minette Layne/WikiMedia Commons

Keep Up the Fight to Stop Coal Exports in Oregon

3/21/2013 // By Robyn Carmichael

Good news came last week in the battle to protect Oregon’s fish and wildlife from toxic coal pollution. Thanks to support from wildlife advocates like you, multi-billion dollar coal giant Ambre Energy experienced a major setback in its plans to …

Sucia Island State Park is a 564-acre marine park with 77,700 feet of shoreline. Sucia Island is considered the crown jewel of the state's marine park system. It is consistently ranked as one of the top boating destinations in the world. Sucia Island and several smaller islands comprise the "Sucia group."

Share Your Photos to Protect Washington’s State Parks

3/12/2013 // By Cathy Curley

Next week, our beloved Washington State Parks will turn 100 years old, but their future is uncertain as budget cuts put the entire park system at risk. The thought of losing these special places tugs at my heart.  As I …

Otter Creek Rally

Northern Cheyenne Tribal Members Demand Comprehensive Study of the Otter Creek Coal Mine

3/7/2013 // By Alexis Bonogofsky

Yesterday more than 170 Northern Cheyenne tribal members submitted detailed and substantive comments to the Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) asking for a thorough, transparent and comprehensive study of the proposed Otter Creek coal mine in southeastern Montana. Tribal …

Western Snowy Plovers

Cuts to State Parks Threaten Washington’s Plovers

2/25/2013 // By Robyn Carmichael

For the last 100 years, Washington’s 116 state parks have provided invaluable natural, cultural and historical resources for visitors and crucial habitat for a diversity of wildlife, including one of our state’s most at-risk species—the western snowy plover. Historically, western …

Print