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Since 1900, Puget Sound Chinook salmon populations have declined 93% and nine runs of Chinook have gone extinct. Orca whales, which eat primarily salmon, have declined by half. Source: Minette Layne/WikiMedia Commons

Is Building in Floodplains a Good Idea?

3/28/2013 // By Dan Siemann

“Where will we put the next million people moving to Puget Sound?” I was asked this question recently by a business lobbyist concerned that new floodplain protection requirements would make building in flood-prone areas more difficult. His question was driven […] Read more >

Since 1900, Puget Sound Chinook salmon populations have declined 93% and nine runs of Chinook have gone extinct. Orca whales, which eat primarily salmon, have declined by half. Source: Minette Layne/WikiMedia Commons

Keep Up the Fight to Stop Coal Exports in Oregon

3/21/2013 // By Robyn Carmichael

Good news came last week in the battle to protect Oregon’s fish and wildlife from toxic coal pollution. Thanks to support from wildlife advocates like you, multi-billion dollar coal giant Ambre Energy experienced a major setback in its plans to […] Read more >

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Tanker Accident at Vancouver Coal Terminal – A Sign of Things to Come?

12/7/2012 // By Peter LaFontaine

An accident at the West Coast’s biggest coal port adds to the laundry list of reasons why coal is a bad bet for Oregon and Washington. Read more >

Orcas

Washington Activist Gives Orcas a Voice

10/18/2012 // By Robyn Carmichael

What would orcas say about proposals to ship up to 150 million tons of coal per year on trains running along the Columbia River and Puget Sound through sensitive habitat? That’s the question that Washington activist Richard Bergner so creatively […] Read more >

Coal trains (like this one in Waterloo, Indiana in 2010) derail more often than you would think, and the consequences can be grim. (photo: Ray Steup)

Loaded Coal Train Derails Near Columbia River Gorge

7/3/2012 // By Peter LaFontaine

30 rail cars filled with coal overturned in an accident in Washington, spilling their dirty fuel — but the industry would like you to believe that everything is peachy. Read more >

Moving People out of Floodplains to Protect Them and Wildlife

3/22/2012 // By Bryn Fluharty

Rising Water At first the rains come as a light drizzle, tapping out a soothing melody on rooftops and windowpanes. Soon the tempo quickens to a loud drum beat of impending danger. As the rain falls harder and harder the […] Read more >

Comparison of fish at the same age, reared in the main river channel (left) and reared in the floodplain (right). Source: Jeffres et al., 2008

Puget Sound’s Vanishing Salmon

3/20/2012 // By NWF

In the Pacific Northwest, we are blessed with the kinds of surroundings that most people just read about in the glossy pages of magazines. Accordingly, we want to build homes and businesses as close to that natural beauty as we can get – often, in floodplains. Unfortunately, in doing so, we destroy the natural systems that sustain this essential ecosystem. Read more >

Cherry Point, Washington, site of a proposed coal export terminal (photo: Paul Anderson)

NWF Members Say “More Orcas! No Coal!”

3/1/2012 // By Peter LaFontaine

NWF members joined record numbers of citizens to fight Big Coal’s latest scheme: exporting millions of tons of dirty fuel to China. The battle has just begun, but we plan to show up with a vengeance. Read more >

An Orca breaches near Washington State's San Juan Islands (photo: TheGirlsNY/flickr.com)

Protect the Northwest’s Endangered Orcas from Dirty Coal

1/27/2012 // By Peter LaFontaine

Coal exports threaten the health of people and wildlife in the Pacific Northwest. Speak up now to protect Orcas and other endangered species. Read more >

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Imperiled Wilderness: Eight Things You Probably Don’t Know about Alaska’s Bristol Bay

7/11/2011 // By Roger Di Silvestro

The 40,000-square-mile Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska stretches across pristine tundra and wetlands crisscrossed with rivers that flow into the bay. Up to 40 million sockeye salmon return to this watershed each year—the world’s largest salmon run. In addition […] Read more >