Orioles

Orioles can often be seen in trees foraging for insects and fruits. Photo by Janice Sommerville, National Wildlife Photo Contest

Bringing Baltimore Orioles Back to the Ballpark

Baltimore’s native birds need our help. According to the North American Breeding Bird Survey, Baltimore oriole populations have declined throughout their range. Much like our baseball team, Baltimore orioles winter in warmer …

Dogs playing on the beach. Photo by Abby Barber

Meet Your Pets’ Wild Relatives

Ask me to describe my dog, Humphrey, in one word and I immediately think “Wild.”  Not just because he is a sweet-faced troublemaker, but because he reminds me of his …

National Wildlife Week: Baltimore Community Habitat Steps Up for a Healthy Bay

We all know that Baltimore is for the birds, and NWF and the National Aquarium, its Maryland affiliate, have teamed up to help Baltimore “B’More Wild”— aiming to create the …

blog nest robin 400742 Rick Rosenzweig

How to Offer Bird-Nesting Materials in Your Garden

Spring is here, and birds around the world—and in your backyard—are turning into construction crews. It’s nesting time! Many songbirds are master builders, putting together intricately made weavings of twig …

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Twelve Tree-Mendous Wildlife Facts for National Wildlife Week

An Altamira oriole swoops in behind a green jay

Photo of the Day: Green Jay Photobombed by Altamira Oriole

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