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An osprey seen flying over the Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge, followed by a black tern. Photo Credit: Ken Sturm, USFWS

Exploring the Missisquoi River – What’s at Stake from a Tar Sands Spill in Vermont?

8/15/2014 // By Annie Mackin

On a lazy August afternoon in the Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge, the wide river flows under gently bobbing white and yellow water lilies, around easily missed turtles basking on rocks, past watchful tall herons, and narrows on its way out […] Read more >

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Surprising Similarities: What’s Going on in YOUR Backyard?

8/15/2014 // By Guest Author

By Kim Kurki, author of World of Birds: A Beginner’s Guide Did you ever think of hummingbirds and woodpeckers as similar? Until recently, I didn’t. Where I live in Eastern North America, Ruby-throated hummingbirds have been lapping up nectar from […] Read more >

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Celebrating 150 Years of Yosemite and Its Remarkable Wildlife

6/29/2014 // By Beth Pratt-Bergstrom

Editor’s Note: Yosemite National Park celebrates its 150th anniversary on Monday, June 30, and although many visit for the awe-inspiring scenery, NWF’s California Director (who lives on the southwest border of the park and worked in Yosemite for a decade) […] Read more >

Machias Seal Island Puffin

The Puffins of Machias Seal Island

6/26/2014 // By Guest Author

Opening the small window of the duck blind on Machias Seal Island (off the coast of Maine) to observe the puffins was exhilarating. For the next 45 minutes, I was able to unobtrusively observe puffin behavior, see their colorful markings, […] Read more >

Not only would Vermont moose be threatened by a tar sands spill here, but they also face challenges due to climate change that will be exacerbated by runaway tar sands expansion. Credit: David Govatski USFWS

Vermont Leads New England on Path to Cleaner Fuel Mix

6/20/2014 // By Annie Mackin

As more Vermonters learn about the threat of climate disrupting tar sands—one of the planet’s dirtiest and most carbon polluting fuels—being transported through the Northeast Kingdom via an aging oil pipeline, it’s increasingly clear that they want nothing to do […] Read more >

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Photos of Wildlife Across America

6/16/2014 // By Beth Pratt-Bergstrom

This week, I returned from a road trip vacation across America, driving from Boston to my home outside Yosemite, California. I visited four national parks, and spent an extended period in Yellowstone, where I worked for three years. During my trip, I encountered […] Read more >

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From Pristine Bird Haven to Toxic Trap: Canada’s Tar Sands Threaten New England Birds

6/11/2014 // By Annie Mackin

When Americans talk about tar sands, one of the most pernicious and devastating industrial undertakings the world has ever seen, those lucky enough not to have a pipeline running through their property generally think of a faraway threat. However, while […] Read more >

Photo donated by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Maggie Bond.

The Beauty, Majesty and Variety of Ducks Challenged by Tar Sands

6/11/2014 // By Russell Bassett

Bufflehead, black and wood ducks, canvasback, gadwall, goldeneye, mallard, pintail, redhead, ring-necked, ruddy, scaup, scoter, shoveler, teal, and widgeon: to duck hunters and bird watchers alike, the characteristics of those species and the sounds they make are like sweet music […] Read more >

Wood duckling jumps from nest by Harlan Albers.

Wood Ducklings Jump, But Don’t Worry, They Bounce

6/4/2014 // By Dani Tinker

Wood ducks are special to North America because they are found nowhere else in the world. They were threatened with near extinction in the late 1800s and early 1900s when habitat destruction and over-harvesting decimated populations. Their recovery is a celebrated wildlife success […] Read more >

Radish cover crop growing in winter wheat residue (Sept. 2013) provided lasting wildlife benefits.

Evidence Builds: No Till and Cover Crops Make Working Lands More Wildlife-Friendly

5/20/2014 // By Ryan Stockwell

In late April, when the snow finally receded (I didn’t think spring would ever get here), I decided to take a walk through my field that was winter wheat last year.  As you may recall from a previous post, last […] Read more >