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Andrew Moore, Cooper Elementary School, East Side, 2008, digital chromogenic print scanned from film negative, 62 x 78 in., Collection of Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell. Credit: Andrew Moore

Nature: Driving Revitalization in the Motor City and Beyond

3/1/2013 // By Kara Reeve

  During the roaring 20’s, Detroit glittered as a global center of automobile manufacturing. With a population that soared from 285,000 in 1900 to 1.6 million by 1930, it was the fourth largest city in the United States. As more […] Read more >

Otter Creek

Montana’s Otter Creek Valley and Its Wildlife Need Your Help

2/15/2013 // By Alexis Bonogofsky

The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is accepting comments from the public on the proposed Otter Creek coal mine in southeastern Montana. Arch Coal, the second largest coal company in the nation, wants to strip mine the valley for […] Read more >

Drought in the Rockies, Plains Taking Toll on Fish and Wildlife

12/11/2012 // By Judith Kohler

  The drought persists in the Rocky Mountain West and it’s not just the ski slopes that look rough. Fish and wildlife are feeling the effects: Sagebrush and other plants that pronghorns and mule deer depend on in the winter […] Read more >

A private oil shale test site in northwestern Colorado. Photo by David Ellenberger.

The Push for Oil Shale: News Ripped from Last Century’s Headlines

12/3/2012 // By Judith Kohler

There’s a saying in Colorado about the so-far-fruitless effort to tap the “Saudi Arabia” of oil shale in the region: “Oil shale: It’s the energy of the future… and always will be.” As documented by the Checks and Balances Project, […] Read more >

Bull Elk

The Tongue River Railroad Tries Again: The Little Engine That Couldn’t, Part 1

11/8/2012 // By Alexis Bonogofsky

For my entire life, the Tongue River Railroad Company has been trying – and failing – to build a single purpose rail line to haul coal along the scenic Tongue River in southeastern Montana. Earlier this year, their permit to […] Read more >

Hands-On Habitat Volunteers – A Key to the Future of the Environmental Movement

10/22/2012 // By John Kostyack

The near absence of any discussion of the environment in the presidential debates has led me to think about the state of the U.S. environmental movement. In one sense, conservationists in the U.S. should be proud of all that we […] Read more >

Damaged riparian zone at Oberlin College. Image credit Noah Schwarz

EPA Campus RainWorks Challenge

9/19/2012 // By Sara Gassman

Today’s forecast: 62 degrees with an 85% chance of showers. Put on your raincoat and start singing… Rain, rain, go away. Come again another day… Look at all the puddles forming, and the water rushing down the street to the […] Read more >

Bursting heart in early fall

Photo of the Day: Hearts-A-Burstin’

9/6/2012 // By Rachel Faulkner

Also known as the “American strawberry bush”, “hearts-a-burstin’” and “bursting heart”, Euonymus americanus is a deciduous shrub that gets its common names from the bright red fruit that split open in the fall to reveal orange seeds. Bursting heart is […] Read more >

Close-up of yellow and red tulip

Captivated by a Landscape: Four Special or Ordinary Places to Take Your Breath Away

6/21/2012 // By Patricia Tillmann

Spectacular rainforests are closer to home than you might think. The entire North American coastline from southern Alaska to central California is home to some of the last intact coastal temperate rainforests in the world. It is a stunning landscape, […] Read more >

South Korea Broadens International Green Campus Movement

6/8/2012 // By Julian Keniry

In just three years, South Korea’s Gyeonggi-do Association for Green Campus Initiative (GAGCI), has become one of the world’s hubs for advancing international higher education for sustainability. The association held its third global green campus forum on May 24-25, 2012 […] Read more >