Ryan Stockwell Subscribe to Feed

Ryan is the Agriculture Program Manager for NWF. He also farms in Wisconsin using no till and cover crops to raise corn, soybeans and wheat. Ryan has a Ph.D. in history from the University of Missouri and, when not farming or raising three young boys, he enjoys hunting and spending time in the woods.
Radish cover crop growing in winter wheat residue (Sept. 2013) provided lasting wildlife benefits.

Evidence Builds: No Till and Cover Crops Make Working Lands More Wildlife-Friendly

5/20/2014 // By Ryan Stockwell

In late April, when the snow finally receded (I didn’t think spring would ever get here), I decided to take a walk through my field that was winter wheat last year.  As you may recall from a previous post, last […] Read more >

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No Till, Cover Crops and Wildlife: A Lively Combination

11/5/2013 // By Ryan Stockwell

After harvest of winter wheat earlier this year, an interesting thing happened: my field, with the wheat residue remaining and cover crops growing, became migratory waterfowl Mecca. Why was this?  Well, simply put, a number of management decisions related to […] Read more >

Soil Health, Risk Management, and Wildlife: Observed Benefits of Cover Crops and No Till

6/13/2013 // By Ryan Stockwell

Spring has finally sprung in central Wisconsin.  After a Mother’s Day dusting of snow temps have finally climbed to the seasonal average, but precipitation continues to inundate fields with moisture.  Planting is delayed across the region for corn and bean […] Read more >

Winter Wheat, October 2012.

Three Things I’ve Learned from Converting to No Till and Cover Crops

11/1/2012 // By Ryan Stockwell

As I wrap up year number two of converting my farmland to no till and cover crops, I thought it would be a good opportunity to reflect. No better time than while on the tractor planting winter wheat to think […] Read more >

Wildlife like these Sandhill cranes forage through crop residue in late spring.  No till and cover crops not only protect water quality and improve soil health and productivity, but provide vital habitat and forage for wildlife.

What I Learned About My Farm from Two Minutes in the Rain

8/6/2012 // By Ryan Stockwell

Driving home one evening earlier this summer, I noticed a lot of water in roadside ditches after a sizable storm rolled through the area.  I thought it would be a great opportunity to see if there were any visible differences […] Read more >