Why Developing Oil Shale Gets Us Nowhere

from Wildlife Promise

New Proposed Fuel Source Increases Threat to Wildlife, Public Lands and Water

New DirectionDrilling for oil and natural gas, and mining for coal, has already taken a dramatic toll on our country’s public lands, wildlife habitat and natural resources.

Now Congress is considering a proposal to develop a new dangerous energy source–oil shale–for millions of acres of America’s public lands.

Some technologies for oil shale production can generate up to five times as much CO2 as conventional gasoline, which means it would continue to fuel global warming–the already single greatest threat to wildlife.

As if driving up global warming pollution weren’t enough of a calamity for wildlife and the natural resources we all depend on, here’s what else is at stake with increased oil shale production:

  • OUR WATER: Oil shale production will require upwards of 300 million gallons of water a day. This is scarce water we already need for drinking, agriculture, livestock and wildlife.
  • OUR WILDLIFE: Oil shale development would put at risk at least two million acres of wildlife habitat and continue to raise the harmful impacts of global warming pollution for wildlife and their habitats.
  • OUR WAY OF LIFE: Preserving America’s public lands is an important part of our country’s conservation tradition. Oil shale development threatens to dramatically change the face of some of our most treasured places.

It’s quite disappointing to see Congress considering a move that would be such a backward direction for the real energy solutions we need and deserve.

The current ban on commerical oil shale development expires on September 30. In the lead up to this date, please ask your Members of Congress to extend the ban on developing this dangerous source of fuel.

Whether it’s oil shale or offshore drilling, our country’s leadership must stop chasing the last barrel of oil and start pursuing our clean energy future.