A Mountain Lion’s Tinder Tale

P22-Tinder

P-22’s Tinder profile. Photo credit: National Park Service

When the mountain lion “P-22”  journeyed from his home in California’s Santa Monica Mountains in search of new territory, he somehow made it across two eight-lane freeways and landed in the green spaces of LA’s Griffith Park. He’s been there now for two years. It’s just a tiny fraction of his natural range, and he’s the only mountain lion there. He’s trapped by traffic and stuck in a lonely bachelor pad!

Though a dating app like Tinder would help humans find love in the city, for poor P-22, Tinder would not yield any cougar love matches within Los Angeles’ Griffith Park. He is trapped within the confines of Los Angeles’ busy and dangerous highways with no mate in sight or in his foreseeable future. This is not the Hollywood ending the world wants!

So how can wildlife lovers play Cupid? Join National Wildlife Federation’s #SaveLACougars campaign. The campaign is aimed to create awareness for the plight of wildlife trapped by traffic and assist in the creation of a safe and beautiful wildlife crossing for the 101 Freeway at Liberty Canyon.

Help mountain lions who live in the hills outside LA find love by contributing to NWF’s #SaveLACougars campaign.  Love is out there, they just have to safely cross the 101 Freeway to find it.

Get Involved!

Take ActionAdd your voice for California mountain lions – urge the Department of Transportation to support the creation of a wildlife crossing at the 101 Freeway.

You can also help mountain lions by donating to the #SaveLACougars campaign!

Never Miss A Story!

© 1996-2018 National Wildlife Federation   |   PO Box 1583, Merrifield VA 22116-1583   |   1-800-822-9919 (M-F 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. EST)

National Wildlife Federation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization

Protect Wildlife