National Wildlife magazine

Pika

Witnessing Wildlife and Climate Out of Sync

Wildlife and climate are now frequently out of sync. These photos—all entries to National Wildlife magazine’s annual photo contest—show just a handful of the species struggling to adapt to an altered climate.

First issue of National Wildlifewas available in December 1962

Sharing Wildlife Success Stories

Since 1936, the National Wildlife Federation has worked to conserve the nation’s wildlife and wild places. As part of our 80th anniversary celebration, we are recognizing important moments in our …

A dragonfly gobbles an Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus. Photo by Eric Stavale.

Safeguard Safely Against Zika

Two weeks into the unofficial start of summer, the mercury is rising across much of the country — along with widespread fear about the mosquito-borne Zika virus. As of this …

Fuzzy-legged Leafcutter Bee (Megachile melanophaea) by Clay Bolt

Sharing a Passion for “Beautiful Bees”

Like most people, Clay Bolt once pictured the familiar black-and-yellow-striped honey bee as soon as he heard someone say the word “bee.” These much beloved but beleaguered insects were brought …

Bumble Bee by Julie Chen

5 Facts About Bumble Bees—and How To Help Them

Common Loon by Gary Lackie

Biologists Study Impact of BP Oil Disaster On Loons

Raccoon kits by Barbara Fleming

How to Keep Wild Raccoons Wild

Purple Martin by Richard Winegar

The Case of the Missing Martins

  A few weeks ago, I headed down Interstate 95 from my home in Washington, D.C., to attend a quirky festival, “Gone to the Birds,” held each August in Richmond, …

Augochlorella aurata

Photo Gallery: Surprising Backyard Bees

Until a few months ago, if someone said the word “bee,” I’d immediately picture the familiar black-and-yellow-striped honeybee or perhaps a big, fuzzy bumblebee—both regular summer visitors to the flowers …

Northern Cardinals by Paul Brown

Help Bugs—and Birds—By Growing Native Plants

Like most environmentally-friendly gardeners, I’ve long known that it’s better to cultivate native than nonnative plants. Adapted to local conditions, natives thrive better—and with less water and other expensive inputs …

  • Page 1 of 2
  • 1
  • 2

© 1996-2017 National Wildlife Federation   |   PO Box 1583, Merrifield VA 22116-1583   |   1-800-822-9919 (M-F 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. EST)

National Wildlife Federation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization

Protect Wildlife