native plants

Monarch on swamp milkweed. Photo by Jim White

More of Your Wildlife Gardening Questions Answered

Why are native plants important? Native plants are the plant species naturally found in your region. Each region has its own unique plant communities that are adapted to the local soil types, …

An indigo bunting, northern cardinal, goldfinch and oriole visit a bird feeding station. Photo by Melissa Penta.

Answers to Your Wildlife Gardening Questions

Will birds starve if I don’t keep my feeders filled? Feeding birds is one of the most popular hobbies, but many people fear that once they start feeding, they can’t …

Photo by David Mizejewski

Six Sustainable Ways to Maintain a Natural Garden

The National Wildlife Federation has been educating and empowering people to create wildlife-friendly gardens through the Garden for Wildlife program since 1973. Each of us can help support local wildlife …

Photo by scottie32 via Flickr Creative Commons.

Five Ways of Making Your Lawn Better

Fall is a great time to get your yard ready for the next growing season. The cooling temperatures often make working outside less taxing, and some of the late-blooming plants in …

Baltimore Oriole photographed by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Janice Sommerville

We’ve Always Been a City for the Birds

Bumble Bee by Josh Mayes

10 Ways to Save Pollinators

Photo by Mark Brinegar.

Take the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge

Tiger lily and tiger swallowtail in California

9 Wildflowers Pretty Enough to Sing About

Walking down a nearby trail this weekend, I passed a patch of golden buttercups. A few minutes later I found myself singing “Build Me Up, Buttercup” as I bobbed down …

Carolina Chickadee by Doug Tallamy

Chickadees Show Why Birds Need Native Trees

This year, more than ever, I had been looking forward to songbird-nesting season. The reason? Last spring, my Washington, D.C., yard became one of more than 100 study sites in …

Monarch Butterfly by Bernadette Banville

The Goldenrod Allergy Myth

Goldenrod blooms are an autumn delight—both for human admirers and wildlife visitors. I can’t help but smile when I see the sunny blossoms, teeming with pollinators. That’s what makes hearing …

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