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Monarch feeding on Prairie Verbena. Photo by Marya Fowler

Collaborating to Save the Monarch Migration

2/5/2016 // By Grace Barnett

The migration of monarch butterflies is one of the natural world’s most epic journeys. The eastern population of monarchs flies up to 3,000 miles from their summer homes in America’s backyards and grasslands to wintering grounds in Mexico’s mountain forests. …

Black-footed ferret. Photo by Steve Bender

Affiliate of the Week: Kansas Wildlife Federation

2/1/2016 // By NWF

In honor of our 80th Anniversary celebration throughout 2016, the National Wildlife Federation is recognizing each of our Affiliate Partners in a special “Affiliate of the Week” blog series that showcases the dedicated conservation efforts taking place across the country …

Orlando Wetlands Park Sunrise

This Week in NWF History: Saving Coastal Fisheries and Habitat

1/25/2016 // By NWF

Since 1936, the National Wildlife Federation has worked to conserve the nation’s wildlife and wild places. As part of our 80th anniversary celebration, we are recognizing important moments in our history that continue to make an impact today. Ten years ago, the …

Great Blue Heron at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Photo donated by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Alan Waters

Living Shorelines: Birds and Blue Carbon

1/21/2016 // By Stacy Small-Lorenz

We often say that healthy coastal ecosystems can help reduce risks from climate change impacts like sea level rise, more frequent and intense coastal storms, and related erosion, while providing valuable habitat and ecosystem services, like water purification. A recent study …

A manatee nurses her calf in the warm waters of the Three Sister's Spring. Photo by John Muhilly.

Clean Water Rule Safeguards Streams

12/18/2015 // By Lacey McCormick

Small streams eventually become big rivers. That’s the commonsense principle behind the new Clean Water Rule, which will restore Clean Water Act protections to smaller streams and nearby wetlands. This week, clean water and wildlife saw an important victory as …

monarch on southern red cedar

From White House to Texas, a Growing Buzz Around Pollinator Protection

12/9/2015 // By Collin O'Mara

When you’re in your garden collecting milkweed seed pods on a windy fall afternoon, you may not realize you’re part of a burgeoning nationwide effort to protect America’s pollinators. As someone who’s seen firsthand how local, state and federal agencies …

Oystercatchers are just one species that rely on oyster reefs-- but this habitat has declined across the Gulf. Photo donated by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Kathy Reeves.

$80 Million Announced for Gulf Restoration Projects

11/16/2015 // By Ryan Fikes

The National Fish & Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) has recently announced a third round of projects funded by BP and Transocean’s 2012 criminal settlement. To date, nearly $480 million from this fund has been designated for restoration projects benefitting wildlife across the Gulf Coast. In …

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What We Know Now About the BP Oil Disaster

11/9/2015 // By Ryan Fikes

It’s been more than five years since the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded. Since that time, a council of federal and state Trustees have been extensively investigating the impacts of the disaster on wildlife and habitats, but that information has …

Monarch Butterfly. Photo by NWF Austin Habitat Stewards Jim and Lynne Weber

Monarch Heroes Taking Flight in Texas

10/13/2015 // By Marya Fowler

Monarch Heroes Program Launched in 15 schools in Texas  To help build awareness and reverse monarch decline in Texas, NWF launched our Monarch Heroes Program with the Austin and Houston Independent School Districts in September. This environmental education and outreach …

Least tern family. Photo donated by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Ursula Dubrick

Least Terns: Life on the Edge

10/12/2015 // By David Muth

Least terns live life on the edge. Only nine inches long and packing just 1.5 ounces of muscle and feather, they are aptly named. Despite their size, they are prodigious migrants—heading south in August and September to the coast of …

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