The National Climate Assessment shows that wildlife and communities are already feeling the impacts of climate with rising seas, ocean acidification, heavier precipitation, changes in growing seasons, decreased cold and snow pack, increased incidence of pests, devastating wildfires and droughts, and other significant impacts.  Photo by Mary Harvey

Why Wildlife is Cheering for the Clean Power Plan

[8/3/2015 // By Jim Murphy]

President Obama has taken a historic and ambitious step in the fight against carbon pollution that threatens wildlife. With the announcement of the finalized Clean Power Plan, the President has enacted the first ever rules designed to reduce harmful greenhouse …

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Monarch Butterfly. Photo by NWF Austin Habitat Stewards Jim and Lynne Weber

Austin, Texas Creates Habitat for the Declining Monarch Butterfly

[8/3/2015 // By Patrick Fitzgerald]

The City of Austin, Texas sits at a critical migration point for the monarch butterfly. In the spring, Austin is one of the first places in the U.S. that the monarch stops to lay its eggs on milkweed, so the next …

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Wildlife Camping in Our Backyards

A member of the Service Employees International Union speaks out for continued climate action in Baltimore.

Taking Climate Action in Maryland

[7/31/2015 // By Jillian-Taylor Stokes]

Maryland is famous for its wetlands, delicious seafood, and unique biodiversity, all thanks to the Chesapeake Bay. With over 3,000 miles of coastline, the Free State is the third most vulnerable to sea level rise. Highly sought bay species like …

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Moose depend on clean water in rivers, streams and ponds, where they feed on aquatic plants.
Photo by Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Leah Serna.

5 Reasons Why Oil and Water Don’t Mix for Wildlife

[7/1/2015 // By Jim Murphy]

We all know that oil and water don’t mix. But the stakes are especially high for wildlife when oil spills into the lakes, streams and rivers where wildlife live. If industry has its way, more tar sands oil – a …

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Baltimore Oriole photographed by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Janice Sommerville

We’ve Always Been a City for the Birds

[7/15/2015 // By Kim Martinez]

Baltimore.  Home of the beloved Baltimore Orioles and affectionately known by residents as Birdland.  There’s no better place for the National Wildlife Federation to launch its signature Community Wildlife Habitat program, encouraging residents to Grow Together. McElderry Park is one of …

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Teaching the next generation to kayak #proveronawrong. Photo shared by David Harp

Where is Everyone? Growing the Next Generation Outdoors

[7/20/2015 // By Hilary Harp Falk]

The drumbeat of news about kids in nature is bad – childhood has largely moved inside, screen time use is at an all-time high (and has real consequences), unstructured playtime is shrinking. Most recently, my friend Rona Kobell with the …

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Nature Bracelet

5 Under 5: Add (Lightweight) Fun To Your Campout

[6/27/2015 // By Jessie Yuhaniak]

Now that Great American Campout season is underway, I’ve got outdoor fun on my mind! As much as I love to unplug and relax when I’m out on the trail, when I take a trek with my niece and nephew, …

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Red wolf.  Photo by Curtis Carley, USFWS.

Landowners Needed to Save the Red Wolf

[7/24/2015 // By Jen Mihills]

The last fourteen remaining red wolves were rescued from the brink of extinction 35 years ago and became the ancestors of all red wolves alive today. Through careful breeding and reintroduction efforts, there are now 50-75 red wolves raising pups. …

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Healthier Waters for the Chesapeake Blue Crab