clean-water-act Subscribe to Feed

Gina Signs Clean Water Rule

Historic Day for Clean Water

6/5/2015 // By Collin O'Mara

Last Wednesday will be remembered among the most important days for America’s natural resources— the day in which Clean Water Act protections were restored for more than two million miles of streams, millions of acres of wetlands, and one-third of all Americans …

Weekly News Roundup: Standing up for Wetlands, Streams & more!

4/17/2015 // By Linda Argueta

Wildlife like river otters depend on clean water and healthy rivers to live. Without clean water, we are putting countless river otters and other wildlife in danger. Right now, members of Congress need to hear your voice! Urge them to …

Even this mountain goat thinks the New Madrid Levee is crazy. We could operate Yellowstone National Park and eight other National Parks for a year for the same amount! Photo from Yellowstone National Park

What Else Could Taxpayers Get For $165 Million?

4/14/2015 // By Melissa Samet

Wednesday is Tax Day. Across the country, millions of Americans are sitting down and taking stock of exactly how much we owe the IRS. Most Americans don’t want the federal government to take our money and spend it on a …

Credit: James "Newt" Perdue / USFWS

Small but Mighty: Streams and Wetlands that Matter

4/13/2015 // By Tori Leach

Marshes, wetlands, intermittent streams, and even some lakes fill from rainwater or snowmelt then empty through evaporation—coming and going throughout the year. These small but mighty habitats filter out pollution, ease the effects of flooding, and provide water for wildlife …

otter

6 Ways the Clean Water Act Benefits You

2/3/2015 // By Maggie Yancey

The EPA is poised to finalize a rule restoring Clean Water Act protections to many of America’s streams and wetlands. But before this rule can protect us from pollution, the rule must first survive the new Congress. On Wednesday, February 4 this proposal–and the science behind it–will be under attack during a rare joint congressional hearing. If this rule is passed then fair and consistent safeguards will once again protect our drinking water supplies—our nation’s rivers, streams, wetlands and lakes.

River otter, Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge

NWF Hosts 2015 Wildlife Conservation Briefing with Congresswoman Ann McLane Kuster

1/28/2015 // By Samantha Lockhart

On January 3, 2015 the 114th Congress was sworn in – and with it came an incredible opportunity to make 2015 a year of conservation victories for wildlife. That’s why we got together last night by phone with over 150 …

The rare swamp rabbit is found in the New Madrid Floodway. Its dense fur makes it possible for the rabbit to regularly take to water to escape predators or reach new habitat. (Missouri Department of Conservation)

5 Reasons EPA Should Veto the New Madrid Levee

12/16/2014 // By Lacey McCormick

The Army Corps of Engineers is proposing to levee off a critical flood relief valve on the Mississippi River in the bootheel of Missouri—at a cost to taxpayers of $165 million. The New Madrid Levee is a destructive boondoggle that …

Grizzly bear on the Battle River in Alaska

Weekly News Roundup: Standing up for Clean Water and more!

11/14/2014 // By Linda Argueta

For years, it has been unclear which streams and wetlands are protected under the Clean Water Act. This April, the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released a proposal that would clarify which streams and wetlands …

278686 Black Bears Lisa Thompson.jpg

Pass the Proposal to Protect Clean Water

11/10/2014 // By Maggie Yancey

Arkansas residents have already come extremely close to losing one of their most beloved and keystone animals, the black bear. Arkansas was once unofficially known as “The Bear State,” but black bear populations reached a point of near extinction after …

Osprey

A Way Forward to Protect Osprey’s Coastal Habitat

11/3/2014 // By Jane Kirchner

The awe-inspiring osprey are found near ponds, rivers, lakes and along our coastal waterways. But coastal development combined with the impacts of superstorms and extreme weather events such as Hurricane Sandy could spell trouble for coastal communities and wildlife.

Print