Call to Action For Red Wolves: “We Cannot Turn Our Back on a Native Species”

There are fewer than 40 red wolves left in the wild—freely roaming the forests and marshes of eastern North Carolina.  Almost 20,000 Americans sent messages calling on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to make the right decision for this endangered species in the wild by continuing the crucial program that will save them.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to dramatically scale back recovery efforts and allow red wolves in the wild to be captured, harassed or killed if they roam onto private property. Hear why friends of wildlife are urging the agency not to give up on the red wolf in the wild:

“We cannot turn our back on a native species and allow them to go extinct in the wild. To do so would be to abandon our shared American conservation ethic which has been promoted by Republicans and Democrats alike for many decades.  This species is one of last apex predators in the southeastern United States. These wolves can and must play a critical role in maintaining healthy ecosystems.  The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s decision to focus resources on a captive population of red wolves and scale back reintroduction efforts is a step in the wrong direction. We need red wolves roaming safely and freely in North Carolina and beyond–and we must implement science based management actions to establish, maintain, and increase wild populations. We must abide by the principles outlined by the Endangered Species Act and protect the red wolf for future generations to see in the wild. There are places in the Wild for these legacy animals.”– Christine – Asheville, NC

“During the last thirty years I have lived in the vicinity where red wolves reside.  I am familiar with their den environment, socialization and breeding habits, I am also aware of their significant value to the eco-system.  Over the past thirty years, I, nor any of my neighbors have had any negative or adverse encounters with red wolves.  Eastern North Carolina is geographically a well equipped and healthy environment for breeding pairs of red wolves.  There are enough pockets of wild land throughout the region to sustain a healthy red wolf population….the red wolf has the special distinction of being the only canid in the western hemisphere that descends from America. It should be the moral and ethical duty of all individuals, particularly the agencies relegated to protect our countries wildlife to come up with a workable solution for all parties involved.  I respectfully request the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to continue the Red Wolf Recovery Program and work to restore a healthy red wolf population on the Albemarle Pamlico Peninsula.” – Jennifer, Pantego, NC

“Dear Fish and Wildlife Service,  First, let me say that I appreciate as a U.S. citizen all the difficult and challenging work that you do to support and sustain our precious wildlife.  That is exactly what it is.  I have traveled to Europe, and the most important thing that I appreciate about my own country is its diverse wildlife.  I would not wish to live in a place where I never saw wildlife.  This is a passion with me.  Our fellow creatures on this planet deserve our protection and the very best efforts on our part as human beings to protect them IN THE WILD!  They are just trying to survive and reproduce just like all of us, and they deserve no less an opportunity to do that.  It is the basic tenet of my life and one by which I live everyday, that when we ‘appropriate’ the habitat of other species we OWE them all the assistance we can give to see that they not only survive, but flourish.  We are all, each and every one of us, diminished every single time a beautiful species leaves this earth through our greed or just simply not caring.  We have the power to COME TOGETHER and find solutions to these problems.  There MUST ALWAYS BE ROOM FOR COMPROMISE!  Compromise is imperative in the constant assault on our wild places and our wild populations.  Please do not give up on red wolf recovery efforts–it is not the American way.” – Sheila, Sugar Hill, Georgia

“Stand up for our dwindling habitat and wildlife.”  – Paula, Dubuque, Iowa

“Americans want our wildlife to live and be free on land that is wilderness. We want our species to be protected. We are very proud of our American native species and want to be good stewards of these amazing gifts. Red wolves are a loved species that inspire us in many ways. We can come together, all of us-Agency experts, private landowners, and state officials.  We CAN stop the decline, and recover the red wolf in the wild. This species used to range across much of the southeastern United States. Wolves have and do play a critical role in maintaining healthy ecosystems.  The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s decision to focus resources on a captive population of red wolves and scale back reintroduction efforts is a step in the wrong direction. We want red wolves roaming safely and freely in North Carolina and beyond. We must implement science based management actions to establish, maintain, and increase wild populations. We Americans love our Endangered Species Act. We really do! Please protect the red wolf for future generations to see in the wild.  I am asking as an American citizen, as someone who understands the majority of Americans want you to reevaluate your proposed rule, and put forward a plan that charts out a true path to recovery.  Thank you very much for being a true protector of our beautiful American land!” – Amanda, Ellsworth, Maine

“I am a professional biologist, area of expertise is in field biology, fresh water ecosystems, and water quality.  I am very familiar with the USFWS. I understand that their funding has been diminished, however, the saving of species from extinction has got to receive the greatest priority.  The USFWS must look toward increasing habitat acres for the red wolf, areas in which they may find protection, food and water, and security from being killed.  Habitat availability is primary to any living species, and the Service must work towards saving the red wolf and by developing refuge areas is one of the most important things that should be done.” – Marian, Bellevue, NE

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