Snake River

Chinook salmon

Five Reasons We Should Restore the Lower Snake River (and Support the Northwest Infrastructure Proposal)

Click here to join the livestreamed conversation between wildlife champions Rep. Blumenauer (D-Oregon) and Rep. Simpson (R-Idaho) as they discuss bipartisan, common ground solutions to saving our endangered wild salmon …

A sockeye salmon swims in Redfish Lake.

Who Was Lonesome Larry?

Summer is at its peak, bringing with it soaring temperatures and relentless heat. In recent years, we’ve shattered heat records across the Northwest. Not surprisingly, people are thinking about climate …

My Son, the Sock Guy for the Sockeye

It’s our default setting. We tend to look to adults to effect the change we see needed in the world. What if we were to look to kids instead? Kids …

Protecting Wildlife, Fish, and Forests as We Transition to Clean Energy

All forms of development come at some cost to the environment. Historically, some of the highest costs have been associated with our fossil fuel-based electric system, which has long served …

The Naturals: Snake River Sockeye Salmon

This spring, in the mountains of central Idaho, several thousand young Snake River sockeye salmon will enter Redfish Lake Creek’s tumble, and be swept seaward. A few months later, in …

coho salmon

Wild Salmon Should Unite Us

People in the Pacific Northwest and beyond have been fighting over dams on the Snake River since the last of the floodgates closed in 1975, when the region’s wild salmon …

Chinook salmon in Oregon -- DOE photo by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Talking Snake River Salmon as Spring Approaches

There could be extra water spilling through the dams on the lower Snake and lower Columbia Rivers this spring to help juvenile salmon get downstream – unless last ditch efforts …

Weekly News Roundup – August 5, 2011

Want to know what National Wildlife Federation was up to this week? Here is a recap of the week’s National Wildlife Federation news: Helping Farmers Who Help Wildlife August 4 …

Big Oil’s Threat to Northwest Salmon

For thousands of years, the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia and Snake rivers supported the most diverse and abundant salmon and steelhead populations on Earth. But in recent decades, these iconic fish …

Time for a Salmon Plan That Works

The salmon and steelhead that return to the Columbia and Snake Rivers are like no other fish in the world.  They migrate nearly 1,000 miles, connecting coastal and river communities …

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