International Wildlife Conservation

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How to avoid deforestation sneaking into your shopping cart

In our last blog, the National Wildlife Federation’s International Conservation Team shared how members can be a strong voice for tropical wildlife by “speaking with our wallets” to purchase zero-deforestation …

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NWF Supporters Lend Their Voice to Protect Tropical Rainforest Habitat

The expansion of cattle ranching is one of the leading drivers of deforestation in species-rich areas, like the Amazon rainforest. When tied to deforestation, cattle products such as beef, leather, and tallow …

NWF presents at the Low Emissions Solutions Conference. Photo by Kiryssa Kasprzyk

Representing Wildlife at COP22

On Saturday, November 19th, the 22nd Conference of Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP22) came to a close in Marrakech, Morocco. During the two-week conference, …

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Win-win solutions for the Environment and Wildlife

The National Wildlife Federation recently co-organized an official side event as part of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Marrakech. Our event focused on opportunities to improve management practices on …

NWF works to address deforestation and habitat loss helping protect international wildlife such as Eastern kingbirds. Photo by Andy Reago and Chrissy McClarren

Ensuring the Paris Agreement Works for Forests and Wildlife

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Can South America’s Forests withstand Agricultural Expansion?

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World’s Largest Conservation Conference Celebrates Big Wins

Makapuu Beach Lookout outside of Honolulu, Hawaii, host of IUCN's 2016 World Conservation Congress. Photo by David Burns.

Achieving Zero Deforestation Agriculture

Since 1936, the National Wildlife Federation has worked to conserve the nation’s wildlife and wild places. As part of our 80th anniversary celebration, we are recognizing important moments in our …

Purple martin. Photo by Bill Thomson

How Engaged Consumers Can Help Protect Wildlife In the Amazon

There’s a reason the purple martin (Progne subis) is known as America’s backyard bird. While summering in the U.S., purple martins nest almost exclusively near towns and cities, often in man-made birdhouses. …

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Burgers and Wildlife: Let’s Hear From You

Migratory birds like the purple martin, one of America’s most loved songbirds, rely on tropical forests in the Amazon for wintering habitat. Unfortunately, millions of acres of the Brazilian Amazon …

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