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Wood duckling jumps from nest by Harlan Albers.

Wood Ducklings Jump, But Don’t Worry, They Bounce

6/4/2014 // By Dani Tinker

Wood ducks are special to North America because they are found nowhere else in the world. They were threatened with near extinction in the late 1800s and early 1900s when habitat destruction and over-harvesting decimated populations. Their recovery is a celebrated wildlife success […] Read more >

This polar bear was awaiting the return of sea ice near Churchill, Manitoba. Warmer temperatures have kept sea ice from forming as early as it used to, and polar bears are waiting on shore without food for longer periods of time. Photo donated by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Lara Ferraro.

Landmark EPA Rule Promises to Spur Renewable Energy for Wildlife

6/2/2014 // By Jim Murphy

Today is a momentous day for the future of the planet.  For the first time, rules have been proposed to put meaningful limits on the largest source of carbon pollution: our power sector, which accounts for about 40 percent of all […] Read more >

Weekly News Roundup: Great American Backyard Campout Quickly Approaching and more

5/30/2014 // By Linda Argueta

With June only a couple of days away, that leaves our Great American Backyard Campout only a couple of weeks away! This year, we are aiming for 200,000 people to join our Campout! Have you pledged to campout this year? If […] Read more >

sockeye salmon

Alaska Salmon Cry for Help! (If They Could Talk)

5/29/2014 // By Guest Author

As I write this, tens of millions of salmon are beginning to return to the streams, rivers and headwaters of the Bristol Bay Fisheries Reserve in Alaska.  They are in the final stage of completing a life cycle that began […] Read more >

The Organ Mountains in southern New Mexico are the anchor of a new national monument. Photo by John Gale

Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument: Established From the Grassroots Up

5/21/2014 // By Judith Kohler

People from all backgrounds and political leanings have really put the “public” in “public lands” in New Mexico. For more than a decade, ranchers, business owners, church and civic leaders, Native Americans, sportsmen and women, wildlife advocates, hikers, campers, politicians […] Read more >

Smoke stacks and exhaust. Flickr photo by Dave Sizer

Don’t Double Down on Denial

5/20/2014 // By Russell Bassett

Part 1: The New Evidence (Note: This is the first of a three-part series. Wildlife Promise will release Part 2 “Wildlife at Risk” on May 27 and Part 3 “Sportsmen and Women Have a Key Role in Curbing Climate Change” on […] Read more >

Radish cover crop growing in winter wheat residue (Sept. 2013) provided lasting wildlife benefits.

Evidence Builds: No Till and Cover Crops Make Working Lands More Wildlife-Friendly

5/20/2014 // By Ryan Stockwell

In late April, when the snow finally receded (I didn’t think spring would ever get here), I decided to take a walk through my field that was winter wheat last year.  As you may recall from a previous post, last […] Read more >

A bee in a fishhook cactus flower. Photo donated by National Wildlife Photo Contest entrant Kelly Brewer.

If It Weren’t for Pollinators…

5/19/2014 // By Becca Shapiro

Birds, bees, bats, butterflies, beetles – these small pollinating animals are responsible for providing us with food, fibers, medicines, and more. Pollination occurs when pollen is moved from one flower to another of the same species, allowing fertilization to occur. […] Read more >

Manatees are protected under the Endangered Species Act. Photo by U.S. FWS.

Weekly News Roundup: Today is Endangered Species Day and more

5/16/2014 // By Linda Argueta

Today is Endangered Species Day! Are you aware of what species are protected, endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act? Take a moment and test your knowledge! In other news, a NWF student fellow brought native landscaping to North […] Read more >

Photo Courtesy of Kent Solberg

Meet the Cover Crop Champions

5/16/2014 // By Lara Bryant

Last year NWF began a new program for cover crop expert farmers and agricultural professionals, called the “Cover Crop Champions.” The champions receive small grants to pay the cost of their travel, time, and various expenses to share their expertise […] Read more >