Coastal Restoration

An alligator pokes its head out of the water in the Barataria.

Louisiana’s Best Shot: Restoring the Coast by Working With Nature

When most people recall the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill disaster, they remember picture after picture of oil-covered marshes, pelicans, sea turtles, and other wildlife. Many of those pictures were from the …

Oysters growing on oyster castles in a clear river

Greening the Grey to Grow More Oysters in the Bay

Oysters grow throughout the saltier parts of the Chesapeake Bay. They filter the water, provide ideal habitat for juvenile fish and crabs, and are pretty tasty on a dinner plate. …

First Step Forward for Louisiana Restoration Project

One of the cornerstone projects to restore Louisiana’s Mississippi River Delta—the Mid-Breton Sediment Diversion—has reached a major milestone that brings it one step closer to construction. After decades of study …

Victory for the Prothonotary Warbler in Maurepas Swamp

Recently, a long-awaited victory in National Wildlife Federation’s efforts to restore the Mississippi River Delta and the Gulf of Mexico region was achieved when the RESTORE Council – which controls …

Save the Swamp: But, Beware the “Rougarou”

Walking through a Louisiana swamp at night, the moon is full and the fog hangs low on the surface of an old bayou. All around, there is the movement of …

Big Plans for a Tiny Island

In the Gulf of Mexico, the National Wildlife Federation works to identify and advocate for sound investment of money from the BP oil spill settlement into restoration projects that will …

From the Swamp to the Superdome: Students Connect the Coast…

On a recent Sunday morning, sixteen students from Dillard University and the University of New Orleans joined us on a boat trip to learn about coastal land loss and flood …

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